Tuesday | November 21, 2017

Features Archive

The density tech is an integral part of the crew. He helps set the rolling pattern and guides the roller operators based on numbers he sees on the density gauge. Jaret Morse of TransTech Systems, Latham, New York, suggested gauge operators take readings immediately behind the breakdown roller in many places across the width of the mat. This will give a fuller picture of compaction progress than one or two readings in random places where you “guess” a state inspector might take a core. Then use the data to make rolling pattern adjustments right away. Photo courtesy TransTech.

How to Roll for Bonus, Part 2—Ideas for Perfect Compaction

If misalignment of the screed sections leaves a line in the mat, the...
John Arambul knew when he started putting the airport paving plan together with survey elevations for the job that they were facing a project full of curves and radiuses.

Crestline Construction Controls Tight Tolerances

By Larry Trojak When it comes to airport paving projects, accuracy in grade...
Gasoline, motor oil and other chemicals can wear down the surface of asphalt—particularly in high-traffic parking lots. Tell customers to monitor for any leaks from vehicles. If a spill or leak does occur, tell them to clean it as soon as possible.

When Sealcoating Isn’t Enough: How to Sell Your Customers on Replacing, Resurfacing or Patching

By Bea Bonte Cracks, wear and potholes are telltale signs of asphalt damage,...
Given the enormous production rates expected from Milestone’s customers, the company chose the long-term, four-day storage silos in a 3-by-3 setup. The Milestone team even repositioned the entrance, loading and exit points, enhancing traffic flow for customers and driver safety.

Milestone Contractors Rebuilds Indiana Site with Higher RAP, Long-Term Service in Mind

From Astec Industries In the southern Indiana and Indianapolis area, the name Milestone...
Portable plants typically cost more than stationary plants but offer suppliers the ability to easily move from job to job, allowing them to make up the difference with the ROI that comes from having more work. Be sure to analyze the local market to determine how much capacity will be needed daily as well as factoring in potential growth from outside sales. The permitting process can take as long as two years, so it’s important to start applying as early as possible. The type of permit depends entirely on state and local requirements for the plant location. Keep in mind that portable plants are generally easier to get permits for than stationary because they are temporary.

How to Choose Your Asphalt Plant to Maximize Productivity

By Mike Devine As infrastructure needs grow across the United States, asphalt contractors...

RCI Proves Itself on the Pavement for Aggregate Industries

We all know that when roadways age they tend to crack. What we...

Complex I-4 Success Uses RAP, Asphalt

From Schwartz Media Strategies SGL Constructors has opened the Grand National Drive segment...
The command center at Harrison Construction’s Rutledge Pike office gives dispatchers a live view of all operations. This center was updated in the summer of 2017 to include 12 work stations where employees monitor and direct the company’s 50 haul trucks and additional 50 to 100 trucks it hires daily. Photo courtesy Melody Cook of Harrison Construction.

Harrison Construction Tracks Trucks Reliably

For the 2017 paving season, we dive into an essential area of project...

Judith Corley-Lay Sets Goals to Advance Pavement Preservation

By Paul Fournier Judith Corley-Lay, Ph.D. in civil engineering, brings 40 years of...
Sunrock’s Bryan Pfohl said the team works hard to exceed customer expectations.

Carolina Sunrock’s Excellence Shines with Latest Commendation

Since 2003, Carolina Sunrock LLC, a family-owned construction and materials supplier and highway...

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